Element of the Week

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This week’s key element is FLUORINE

Background Information Fluorine was discovered by André-Marie Ampére in 1810 and named by Humphry Davy after the mineral fluorite. Fluorine is extremely reactive and poisonous but is the lightest halogen and most electronegative element. It exists as a pale yellow gas in standard conditions. How is it used in everyday life? Fluorine is commonly used [...]

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This week’s key element is NEON

Background Information Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay in the late 19th century. It is name from the Greek word for “new”. Neon is a non-reactive monatomic gas under natural conditions and is well known for its properties to do with emission of red light. Neon was discovered when Ramsay chilled a sample of [...]

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This week’s key element is OXYGEN

Background Information Oxygen is a diatomic molecule, meaning that two atoms of oxygen combine to form the element in its natural state. Oxygen is extremely reactive and reacts with most other elements to form oxides. Oxygen’s existence has been predicted and experimented with for thousands of years. It is always been clear that there [...]

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This week’s key element is NITROGEN

Background Information Nitrogen was discovered by Daniel Rutherford in 1772 and named by Jean-Antoine Chaptal in 1790. At room temperature, nitrogen is a gas and is odourless and colourless. It makes up around 78% of the Earth’s atmosphere and is estimated to be the 7th most common element in the entire universe. How is it [...]

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This week’s key element is CARBON

Background Information The English name carbon comes from the Latin carbo for coal and charcoal. Carbon was discovered in prehistory and was known in the forms of soot and charcoal to the earliest human civilizations. Diamonds were known as early as 2500 BCE in China, while carbon in the form of charcoal was made around [...]

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This week’s key element is BORON

 Background Information The name Boron comes from the mineral in which it was originally mined, called borax. Borax has been used for thousands of year as a glaze. A glaze is type of coating that can be used to make ceramics and vases shiny. The Chinese are believed to have used a borax glaze on [...]

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This week’s key element is BERYLLIUM

 Background Information Beryllium was discovered by Louis Vauquelin in 1797 and was first isolated in 1928 by two scientists named Friedrich Wohler and Antoine Bussy. Beryllium is a very rare element and only exists naturally when in combination with other elements. As a free element, beryllium is a solid, steel-grey in colour and is [...]

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This week’s key element is LITHIUM

 Background Information Lithium was discovered by Johan Arfwedson in 1817 and first isolated by William Brande in 1821. It is a soft, silver-white metal with a solid physical state. In standard conditions it is the lightest metal and the least dense solid element. Lithium is highly reactive and flammable so is mostly stored in [...]

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This week’s key element is HELIUM

  Background Information Helium was discovered by Pierre Janssen and Norman Lockyer in 1868 and was named after the Greek   God of the sun Helios. Helium is at the top of the noble gas group in the periodic table ( group 7) and it has 2 electrons. It is odourless, colourless and tasteless [...]

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This week’s key element is HYDROGEN

 Background Information Hydrogen was discovered by Henry Cavendish in 1766 and was later named by Antoine  Lavoisier in 1783. It is the first element of the periodic table and is also the lightest, with an atomic mass of only 1.008. The hydrogen atom has 1 electron. Hydrogen is also the most abundant chemical substance [...]

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